Blockchain is likely to advance the internet of things—and robot rights.

On March 6, 2016, a small drone belonging to the open-source software company Drone Employee lifted into the Russian sky, traveling across an open field of white snow. Drone flight is relatively unremarkable today, but this particular drone wasn’t controlled by anyone. Brought to life by a predetermined agreement, or “smart contract,” running on the Ethereum blockchain, the drone’s engines powered on and it lifted itself into the air, taking a flight path dictated—only and exclusively—by code. The smart contract controlled the drone’s trajectory, without the need for a middleman with a remote to manage the device. Once started, the code governing the drone could not be stopped. If the smart contract had directed the drone to fly into a building or to head straight for a person, there would be no way for anyone to change its direction or stop the flight without physically disabling the drone or modifying the blockchain.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: slate.com